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Blenophobia, The Fear of Needles It is not discussed. It is not well known. Some people may, mistakenly, believe it's just a joke. However, there is a real fear, bordering, on panic, and it increases the sense of pain and it is called "Blenophobia" or the Fear of Needles." In fact, it is estimated that 20 million Americans each year avoid going to the doctor because they fear needle sticks. Needle sticks are an important and vital part of the practice of medicine. First, blood tests are routinely done to test for things such as cholesterol, infections, blood count, blood type and other important diagnostic procedures. Also, needle sticks are used to give injections for everything from vaccines to anti biotics and even re hydration is a patient is found to have low fluid levels. Allergists use needle stick tests to learn what environment factors may be causing allergic reactions and even asthmatic reactions. Very often Blenophobia begins with just a single needle stick that is experienced as painful. Thereafter, the individual has such a fearful reaction that they cannot tolerate going anywhere near the MD's office. It should go without saying that avoiding medical visits can be dangerous for people especially when they are experiencing symptoms that could indicate a dangerous disease or other condition. Not everyone reacts this way to a painful injection. In fact, most of us simply ignore it or take it as part of the process and move on. There are a variety of reasons why an individual will develop this type of phobia while others will not: 1. Some individuals experience pain more intensely than others. 2. Some individuals tend toward anxieties and fears more than others. 3. An accumulation of traumas can serve to overload any person and make them more vulnerable to becoming phobic. 4. Everyone is born with a different genetic potential towards pain, anxiety and other types of experiences. 5. It is likely that all of these interact with one another.

Read full article by Dr Allan Schwartz here.

Date: Feb 27th, 2009
Posted by: Administrator
Source:
http://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?ty pe=weblog&id=405&wlid=5&cn=81
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